France & Scotland 2001

Overarching

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Musée du Louvre

Entering through the second courtyard, we got our first view of the pyramids.

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Vertex

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Musée du Louvre

A close-up of the spine of the large pyramid in the cour Napoléon (that central courtyard).

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Reflection

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Musée du Louvre

While waiting in the very short line to get in, I quickly cut out of line for this picture. Thankfully Amy and Katy were holding my place for me.

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Marble Hall

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Musée du Louvre

Marble, marble everywhere.

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Sphere

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Musée du Louvre

I can’t remember the name of this statue, but the lifelike detail in the hand holding the ball was amazing.

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Aphrodite

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Musée du Louvre

None other than Aphrodite, or Venus de Milo, as she’s better known.

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The Dark Side of Venus

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Musée du Louvre

Again, looking for the uncommon view of the familiar: Aphrodite from behind.

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Louvre Hallway

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Musée du Louvre

The view down the hallway leading to one of the museum’s more famous paintings.

I have never seen so many paintings of half-naked white guys in the throws of death before than on these walls.

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For Nat King Cole

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Musée du Louvre

A bit blurry, but no less haunting.

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Old and new

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Musée du Louvre

One of the advantages to the workers’ strike was that all three of us got in the museum for free. Taking advantage of that, Amy and Katy went out to get something or other, so I had some time to play around in the subterranean lobby.

For scale, there’s a person standing in the center of the photo. The round object to his right is the elevator that went up and down like a push-pop, with the passengers standing on the top.

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Pyramid lines

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Musée du Louvre

I really liked the contrast of the “modern” glass pyramids (here, one of the smaller ones) and the centuries-old Parisian architecture and façades.

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Codex Hammurabi

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Musée du Louvre

The oldest complete existing set of written laws: the Code of Hammurabi.

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Before HTML, there was this Code

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Musée du Louvre

A close-up of the back of the less-frequently photographed 3800-year old Code.

Can anyone read any of that? My Babylonian’s a bit rusty.

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Tranquil marble

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Musée du Louvre

The Cour Puget (Puget Courtyard)

The two marble courtyards (Puget and Marly) were the most quiet, serene and peaceful places I’ve ever been. It was really astounding.

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Louvre facade

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Musée du Louvre

An excellent view of the north façade of the Napoleon Courtyard, one of the pyramids and the Paris ferris wheel in the distance.

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Sarcophagi

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Musée du Louvre

“Bring out your dead!”

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Canopic jar

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Musée du Louvre

A hand-carved sandstone canopic jar in the shape of a Anubis, the jackal-headed god of the underworld. The pharoah’s stomach never had it so good.

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Window statue

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Musée du Louvre

Inside looking out.

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The Mysteries of Egypt

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Musée du Louvre

Just outside one of the Egyptian rooms, note the sphinx by the door.

Apparently while we were in the exhibit, the strike ended, so when we left the Egyptian exhibit to go see some of Van Gogh’s works in another wing, the ticket lady asked to see our tickets. After Amy thoroughly explained our situation, she still demanded that we present our tickets before we could “re-enter”. So, being cheap and a bit museum’ed-out, we decided to leave, having seen much of the artwork I learned about as a kid for free, instead of being Ugly Americans.

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